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The problem with “black Spider-Man” is…

August 15th, 2011 by | Tags: , ,

…that it is essentially covert, or maybe just casual, white supremacy.

How great does this kid look, by the way? Sharp haircut. Sara Pichelli is great.

Here’s the short version:

The long version keeps drifting on me and not coming out correctly, so let me try and boil it down:

The words you choose to use simultaneously reflect and create the world around you. If you make an effort to be effusively positive about things, you’re going to attract people who either share in or enjoy your positivity. The odds are good that they will be positive, too, setting up a situation where you both feed off each other. If you want to keep up a too cool for school distant air, and so your version of effusive praise is “Oh, yeah, that was cool,” then you’re going to attract like-minded people who understand you. Make sense? Everything feeds on everything else.

“Black Spider-Man” otherizes Miles Morales. (It also ignores that he’s half-Puerto Rican, but that’s another conversation entirely.) He’s not Spider-Man. He’s black Spider-Man. He isn’t the new Spider-Man first, or Ultimate Spider-Man first. He’s black Spider-Man. Which is funny, because Barry Allen and Wally West were just the new Flashes. Hal Jordan is a Green Lantern, but John Stewart is the black Green Lantern.

It foregrounds Miles’s race in a conversation where his race should be irrelevant. His race is probably going to end up being just as big a part of his character as it was for Peter Parker–which I do think was a fairly significant part of that character–but in terms of who the character is and how we refer to him, “black Spider-Man” is garbage.

It sets up the adjective-less Spider-Man as the default, and therefore superior, version. Black Spider-Man will always be second-best because he wasn’t first. Comics fans in particular like to prize the original flavor, or whichever flavor was dominant whenever they began reading, so you can’t tell me that isn’t true. Every time I read “black Spider-Man” I taste battery acid. It feels mean, like the most important part of Miles’s character is that he’s (whisper this with me) not white!

Every single person who has dropped the “Batman of Africa” phrase into their news report, writing, solicits, interviews, commentary, criticism, or emails is lazy. Plain and simple. Every single one. If they aren’t mocking the phrase, they are lazy. Whenever I see it, I want to (and usually do) stop reading whatever page I’m on. There is no Batman of Africa, just like there’s no Batman of South America or Batman of Europe. There are Batmen of France, Argentina, and cities, but there are no Batmen of continents. David Zavimbi, Batwing, is the Batman of the Democratic Republic of Congo, or maybe the Batman of Fake-Kinshasha.

“Batman of Africa,” like “black Spider-Man,” plays into these subtle, but still awful, racial and national stereotypes. Africa is “AFRICA” in people’s minds because lazy, racist fiction and news painted it as a monolithic dark continent full of black people. Lies cloud the mind. Africa, like any other continent, features an astonishing amount of ethnic diversity, whether native or immigrant. You don’t even have to open a book to know this. Charlize Theron is African, man. More specifically, and more respectfully, she’s South African. She’s from Johannesburg. She’s famous.

But the mental image that leaps to mind when people say “Africa” is bone nose savages, savage warlords, savage child soldiers, and AIDS savaging the countryside. Not Egypt, or the Ivory Coast, or a continent of one billion people, most of whom are just like us and go through many of the same trials and travails that we do. There’s no diversity in “AFRICA!” That fact is ugly and stupid. It’s 2011. What’s wrong with you?

David Zavimbi, presumably, is Congolese. “Batman of the Congo” has less of a ring to it, but it doesn’t make you look as unforgivably ignorant as “Batman of Africa” does.

Being black is no more remarkable than being white. Miles Morales is notable for being the first black Spider-Man, particularly in Marvel’s Ultimate Universe, but it isn’t his blackness that makes him special. It’s the fact that he’s not Peter Parker. The fact that he’s half-black, half-Puerto Rican, (and how cool would it be if his dad was a dark skinned Puerto Rican and his mom was light skinned black?!), that it looks like he’s taking part in a lottery to get into a good school in the preview images, and that he’s thirteen years old is just sauce. It’s not the meal. It’s part of the meal, sure, but you do yourself and the character (or rather, the concept, what the character represents, or something, because we do not respect characters ’round these parts) a disservice by boiling him down to “black Spider-Man.” He’s so much more than that, judging by the press run Marvel just went on, that breaking him down to being the black Spider-Man is… it’s garbage, it’s lazy, it’s stupid.

It makes you look like Stormy.

This is drifting.

Black Debbie doesn’t exist. I probably could’ve left this at the Sealab video and been good.

Please think before you speak.

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50 comments to “The problem with “black Spider-Man” is…”

  1. :damn:


  2. Agreed. Just call him Miles Morales, or the new Ultimate Spider-Man. And hey, remember “Blaqualad?” Just rolls off the tongue, doesn’t it?


  3. Never cite the year as reason for why people shouldn’t be ignorant. That is a human phenomenon that has persisted since the dawn of time and shows no signs of coming to an end.

    The Africa comment is something else entirely, but I think Black Spider-Man is an unfortunate but still convenient method of describing a character who, at this point in time, isn’t a character, at least a fully-realized one. He’s most defined element, the one of any real interest, the one that captured the media’s attention, has Twitter ablaze, and Stephen Colbert and Fox News in a tizzy, is that Peter Parker has been replaced by an all new half-black, half-Hispanic kid. Unfair to Miles? Perhaps so, and perhaps in time you won’t to have say “the black Spider-Man” after other non-comic nerd folk like us question “Who the hell is Miles Morales?”

    But this is Bendis, so he’ll probably sound EXACTLY like Peter Parker, except with a darker skin tone and well…that’s just the worst damn thing you can do with this idea, isn’t it?


  4. David Zavimbi, presumably, is Congolese. “Batman of the Congo” has less of a ring to it, but it doesn’t make you look as unforgivably ignorant as “Batman of Africa” does.

    I disagree. “Batman of the Congo” sounds great because “Congo” is one of the coolest words mankind has ever come up with. Also one of the worst movies, but that’s another story.

    I’m going to just call him Spider-Miles. I mean, that’s what everyone did for the other replacement Spider-Man, so equality and junk.


  5. Of course, “black Spider-man” other-izes Miles. And, as we all know, to the majority of American comic book readers (and media commentators), Miles Morales is both a cultural AND ethnic other. Racially motivated qualifiers aren’t new, but they aren’t all the fruit of malevolent intent.

    The “black Madonna” or “black Virgin” has been called such throughout Europe for well over a thousand years, as she is understood to be ethnically different from the white complexioned people who revere her image in statues and paintings. The same is true in Latin American where “el Cristo Negro,” or the black Christ is venerated.

    So, I don’t see “black Spider-man” having anything to do with white supremacy, per se. It is simply one of the glaring reflections that come with living in the white-dominated society that is North America.

    Now, the thing about Puerto Rican is that it (as you have impled) does not automatically exclude blackness/African heritage. Someone can be Puerto Rican (culturally) and black (ethnically) the same as one can be American (culturally) and black (ethnically).

    For obvious reasons, American history has done a poor job of showing how the the majority of enslaved Africans in the “New World” didn’t come to English-dominated North America. They were taken to the Spanish-dominated countries of South America: Puerto Rico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Panama, Ecuador, Columbia, Venezuela, Argentina, and Mexico–where their descendants still live today.

    I mean, the largest black population outside of Africa is in Brazil (roughly 80 million). True, Portuguese is the national language there, not Spanish, but it is still part of “Latin America,” and part of a sorely-needed dialog on what it means to be black (ethnically) and Latin (culturally).

    I’m saying this to drive home the point that because his mother is Puerto Rican does not mean that she isn’t black as well, or part black. She could be as Puerto Rican as Felix Trinidad, Roberto Clemente, Bobby Bonilla, Lala Vasquez, Don Omar, Tego Calderon, Rosie Perez or Zoe Saldana, who is Puerto Rican & Dominican).

    It simply remains to be seen how Marvel is going to play it, but they have some interesting options.

    In closing, I think that Zoe Saldana makes a good example of what I mean about the whole “part black, part Hispanic” non-argument. Despite her Latin American cultural heritage, it is seldom ever brought up. To almost all Americans, including African-Americans, she is simply considered black.


  6. I can only guess on the matter since it’s not racial, but I may get what you’re talking about due to possibly having a similar feeling on things when I hear people talk about “Bucky Cap”, as if Bucky was never ‘really’ Captain America because he’s not Steve Rodgers flavor Captain America. It may be a totally different thing, though.


  7. To me Black spiderman in just spiderman in the black outfit :)

    The Batman character has it easy because you can just call him Batwing, so the other bat-africa names are even more silly.


  8. is Marvel setting this up so they can finally do this
    Ebony Spider-Man and Ivory Venom,


  9. I’ve been having this weird premonition of a possible future, say 15 years from now, where I’ll be talking to people about comics and the “black Spider-Man” will come up, to which I’ll always remind people, “Hey, you know, he was Latino too.”

    But like you said, the near total lack of discussion about him also being Latino is a totally different issue. I agree that the way the media is covering the character is definitely emphasizing the otherness of the situation. But I think the thing that concerns me most is that Marvel’s marketing dept was banking on the fact that the otherness would be a big deal for news outlets. That feels cheap to me.

    But, to play a bit of Devil’s Advocate regarding the character and his potential legacy, the thing that I think is nice about comics is that the stories almost always speak louder than any snap judgments and over-simplifications (almost!!!). So if these Miles Morales stories are awesome and people remember them fondly, there’s a really good chance that he’ll go down in comics history as Miles or even as THE Ultimate Spider-Man (kind of like the Sam Jackson Nick Fury is always referred to as Ultimate Nick Fury among people I know and never black Nick Fury). I mean, it’s not like people look back on Spider-Man 2099 and say “remember the Mexican Spider-Man?” So maybe there’s some hope that the otherness will fade away and memories of the character for the character’s sake will remain.


  10. [...] problem with “black” Spider-Man. (via [...]


  11. Great post. Speaking of the concept of “the other” I get curious, have you ever delved into the writings of Edward Said on Orientalism? While there’s plenty in his works that I disagree with, much of his talk on European/American cultures “otherizing” the Middle East and Africa, plus the field of study that sprung up in his wake, is brilliant reading on things such as this.

    And dammit, Miles Morales is THE Ultimate Spider-Man.


  12. Interesting blog. I only stumbled upon this when i’d seen a tweet with this link from Twitter. Hopefully people wouldn’t make too much of issue with race, like when Obama became President or Idris Alba would be in the film Thor.


  13. @Gavok: Spider-Miles is a pretty good name for him.

    Nice work on this post, David – this is the sort of thing that makes me tell people in my FLCS that they need to read this blog.


  14. How about we just call him ‘Fake Ultimate Universe Spider-Man’?


  15. @rizzo: Peter Parker is fake too.


  16. So, why couldn’t Donald Glover play Spider-Man??

    I am still not over this!


  17. I don’t have a problem with the “Black Spiderman” moniker. The default in this society is white and when race is not explicitly mentioned people tend to assume the default. In this case, he’s Spiderman, and he’s black. It’s an accurate descriptor and I find it hard to consider that a putdown on the character (but then again, I don’t see black as less than, can’t speak for anyone else..) I actually think it’s a good thing, mediawise. Forces people to remember that people darker than khaki can have super powers too.

    Also this is somewhat premature because who knows if Black Spiderman will stick, but think of the children who are growing up with Miles Morales as Spiderman, no qualifiers necessary. I was a kid when the Justice League cartoons with John Stewart were on TV. John Stewart wasn’t the black Green Lantern, he was the Green Lantern to me and a lot of kids around my age. I was oblivious to the surrounding media, the actual source said all I needed to know about the character.

    In fact when I heard the live action movie was being made, I did a double take that they cast a white actor for the role. For all I knew, the Green Lantern was always black. Hal Jordan who?


  18. wait a minute does this mean Ultimate MvC3 Spiderman going to have a Different VA?


  19. @Rayosun You and my little cousins agree on that but I couldn’t give them any of my current GL books to teach them about Hal because their Mom would freak…

    Some people still don’t realize this but let me help them out….

    “In the Ultimate Universe, Peter Parker is DEAD…..”

    Therefore, whoever is in the suit, trying to make a difference is Spider-Man.

    By that reasoning, Miles Morales is Spider-Man. No additional moniker is needed…

    Once again, David cuts through the cwap and gets to the core of the matter. Hell, one of my favorite Spider-Man stories by Paul Jenkins had a young black kid inspired by Spider-Man because under that mask he thought it was a brother. Why is it so wrong to some people? Sheesh….


  20. So…we shouldn’t call people “African-Americans”?

    Though I always did like the idea of myself being an Eastern European American…


  21. Rayosun, so did you complain that the movie was about “the White Green Lantern”? Since, for you, the black one was the default?

    The white default in American society is a relative thing. It’s the default in entertainment because we’ve made it the default — because we rarely see people of color on TV and in film, because it’s hard for them to get jobs in Hollywood doing anything but crap like “The Help”. Or Tyler Perry movies. But in American society, it’s not the default in a million neighborhoods and a hundred thousand schools and in our social lives. We still tend to segregate ourselves — in part because we get bombarded with this idea of a white default, which tells us that we should be separate from each other. There’s white and there’s everybody else, the white default says — so we shouldn’t act like one society. The white default perpetuates racial divisions.

    So we need to stop it, if we ever want to get to the point where race really doesn’t matter. If we’re going to persist in labeling Miles “black Spider-Man”, then we need to at least be fair and label Hal Jordan “white Green Lantern”, and so on. Or maybe we can just, as the OP is suggesting, do away with the racial labels altogether.


  22. WarpedElements, there’s nothing wrong with “African-American” if it’s accurate. But Miles is Nuyorican. :)


  23. [...] Comics | David Brothers argues that the problem with Miles Morales is that he is being defined as “the black Spider-Man” rather than simply “Spider-Man”: “Miles Morales is notable for being the first black Spider-Man, particularly in Marvel’s Ultimate Universe, but it isn’t his blackness that makes him special. It’s the fact that he’s not Peter Parker. The fact that he’s half-black, half-Puerto Rican, (and how cool would it be if his dad was a dark skinned Puerto Rican and his mom was light skinned black?!), that it looks like he’s taking part in a lottery to get into a good school in the preview images, and that he’s thirteen years old is just sauce. It’s not the meal. It’s part of the meal, sure, but you do yourself and the character (or rather, the concept, what the character represents, or something, because we do not respect characters ’round these parts) a disservice by boiling him down to “black Spider-Man.” He’s so much more than that, judging by the press run Marvel just went on, that breaking him down to being the black Spider-Man is… it’s garbage, it’s lazy, it’s stupid.” [4thletter!] [...]


  24. “the fact that he’s half-black, half-Puerto Rican, (and how cool would it be if his dad was a dark skinned Puerto Rican and his mom was light skinned black?!),”

    - as someone who is exactly that mix (and a Nuyorican – thanks for bringing in that reference Nojojojo)… I agree that it would be awesome.

    - but as someone who is exactly that mix, I also think you are dreaming. Heck, half of Puerto Rico isn’t ready to address half of that equation yet. Marvel would really be asking people to get over a lot of junk they carry to remain immersed in the story, and Marvel’s job – as they see it and verbalize it – is to entertain not to teach. I don’t think Marvels is really interested in reality-slapping the stereotype of hispanic or latino as part of the Spiderman franchise.

    And I say that with a fair amount of faith in BMB’s intentions/motivations to write a good story.


  25. @nojojojo: Have you seen “The Help”, or are you basing your opinion on what you’ve been told about it?


  26. @Daryll B.:
    LaFronce!!! I loved that story


  27. When I hear ‘the black Spider-Man’, I think of the black costume. As far as other adjectives, Ben Reilly isn’t and never was ‘Spider-Man’, he was Ben Reilly Spider-Man. Dick Grayson Batman, not Batman. Bucky Cap, not Cap. So Miles Spider-Man isn’t a big stretch. The black Spider-Man is a bit lazy, but also funny because he’s only half black. I think Hispanic folks are getting a taste of what white people have to put up with when someone says the president, for example, is black when in reality he’s only half black and was actually raised by a white mother. I also don’t agree with John Stewert being the black Green Lantern. He should be John Steward Green Lantern. I think this will eventually work itself out and he’ll be Miles Spider-Man rather than the black Spider-Man.


  28. @H Bermiss: Yeah, but why not dream big, right? I don’t think Marvel would do it to teach rather than entertain, either. I doubt if Miles is going to have teachable moments spread throughout his series, you know?

    @nojojojo: I agree 100%. The white default only counts in a macro view of the country/world, and it generally doesn’t reflect real life. I’m adamantly opposed to any argument which posits the white default as okay or true or somehow not a problem. That’s 100% ignorance.

    @WarpedElements: African-American is a bit different. That’s a term chosen by the people in question, as part of an attempt to rebuild a cultural self-esteem that had been eroded away by hundreds of years of abuse and genocide. I personally don’t use it, and haven’t since I was a child, but I do understand the reasons why. “Black Spider-Man” is just “Not White Spider-Man,” while “African-American” has a deeper meaning beyond shorthand/dismissiveness.

    @Daryll B.: That was a great story. Definitely one of my favorites.

    @SomeRandomGuy: That would be cool.

    @rizzo: You’re stupid.


  29. Maybe people wouldn’t refer to him as ‘black Spider-man’, if it hadn’t been made such a big deal when he was introduced. If his race hadn’t been mentioned in the original interviews and press releases, maybe I’d be more inclined to think of him as a real character, but frankly the way he was introduced makes me think that he isn’t a character, he’s a prop, a cardboard cut-out produced to tick a few boxes.

    And no, none of this is the problem with ‘black Spider-man’. The problem is that he isn’t Peter Parker.


  30. @david brothers:

    The problem is however, is that rather than referring to a specific place in Africa a la South African American (as my wife is), etc etc, African American becomes an all encompassing thing, just like Batman of Africa, etc.

    I can kinda see where you’re coming from on the ‘build the cultural pride’ thing, but that in itself is still an excuse for one side to do it, but not the other. It’s about as accurate as ‘Black Spider-Man’. The accuracy is just as skewed is all I’m saying.


  31. @david brothers: which one UMVC Miles Spiderman being techinally the second and first black then P.R. cast in the game, or
    the idea of Eddie brock and Miles teaming up and giving the writer the chance to have Eddie be the old Hero/wise man for a change. wait is this the “Screw my marriage over Spider-man.” or is this the “Totally different spider-man?”
    Is there a chance Luke cage get place in a coma and they need to hire some replacement for him?


  32. I think the problem is how to introduce the new characters. I is just the same like with “black green lantern” why call them like that? For me it doesn´t matter what skin-colour a character has, it is the story around them that counts. The biggest problem for me is that the new spider man isn´t peter parker that´s all the problems ;)Just call him spider man because that is what he is.


  33. “Batman of Africa”
    Since, unlike Europe and Asia, there’s only been one Batman recruited on the continent, it makes a certain amount of sense. (Or did I miss an Egyptian or South African Batman?)
    And there was a movie called BatMEN of Africa condensed from the movie serial Darkest Africa
    And most non-fans associate “Batwing” with Batman’s movie aircraft (I knew we should’ve done Whirly-Bats…)

    As to Miles Morales…since you need a “hook” to explain two Spider-Men (technically three, since there also was the original Ultimate Universe Spidey) to non-fans “Black Spider-Man” is convenient.
    Personally, I think he’s too young (12-13) to be “Spider-MAN” so he should’ve been named “Spider-Kid” or “Tween Spidey” or somesuch.


  34. @Atomic Kommie Comics:

    Funny thing about what you say about “black Spider-man”. Kids I work with today consider Venom from the movie to be the Black Spider-Man (they ironically are not aware that the character in the movie is named Venom).


  35. “Maybe people wouldn’t refer to him as ‘black Spider-man’, if it hadn’t been made such a big deal when he was introduced. If his race hadn’t been mentioned in the original interviews and press releases, maybe I’d be more inclined to think of him as a real character, but frankly the way he was introduced makes me think that he isn’t a character, he’s a prop, a cardboard cut-out produced to tick a few boxes. ”
    @ChristyA: His race was mentioned because of the rather poor representation of non-white characters in mainstream comics, especially in major franchises,. Your belief that he was a “prop” used to “tick a few boxes” says more about you than anything else. It appears that you hold the stupid idea that creating a non-white character can’t be anything other than a stunt because white is the default state of creation.


  36. @Atomic Kommie Comics:
    There aren’t two Ultimate spider-Men. there’s one. Parker’s dead and the title has been passed along. but even accepting your statement as valid, it doesn’t explainy why Miles should be called the “Black Spider-Man”. Calling him Miles Spider-Man is a better option. Bucky wasn’t called “Other White Cap”. None of the Flashes were called “Additional White Flash”. why should Miles be called “black spider-Man” instead of “Spider-Man” or “Miles Spider-Man” even? It’s not convenient to point out his race, it pointless and used to imply (whether purposefully or not) that he is abnormal.


  37. Tweet rant I went on a few weeks back:
    http://capntightpants.tumblr.com/post/8576561864/why-is-biracial-spider-man-a-liberal-conspiracy


  38. [...] Brothers points out exactly what the problem is with the phrases “Black Spider-Man” and “The Batman of Africa.” [...]


  39. Thanks a lot for that post. Good points that really made me think.


  40. Good article. The ‘Batman of Africa’ example is also true in sports, where commentators at the World Cup frequently referred to teams from the Ivory Coast or Ghana or Cameroon as ‘the Africans’ but teams from Italy and France and England were never referred to as ‘the Europeans’. What they really meant was ‘the black teams’.


  41. Its a 2-fold problem:

    1. Marvel should not have ‘announced’ the race. Just say, “Hey, here’s is the new Spider-man. His name is Miles” and leave it at that.
    2. Comic blogsites are getting worse and worse at sensationalism, fueled by presumptuous and inflammatory opinion

    I think #2 is a bigger problem. How many blogsites ran with “Is new Spidey black? Is he black?” before Marvel even unmasked the character? Why did it matter so much to these wannabe journalists and writers that I had to see a new post every day until Marvel confirmed it?

    Look at the misunderstanding and subsequent criticisms of DC’s relaunch. Comic fans were up in arms about the whole thing without even knowing a single piece of confirmed news.. .all because the hack comic bloggers made a bunch of assumptions and misled these people into believing it was some kind of fact.


  42. Black Spider-Man will always be second-best because he wasn’t first. Comics fans in particular like to prize the original flavor, or whichever flavor was dominant whenever they began reading, so you can’t tell me that isn’t true.

    It isn’t true. What you’re forgetting is that Peter Parker / Spider-Man is one of the great iconic characters. He’s done well for himself on his own merits, not because of a twist of fate or by riding on another character’s coattails. There is no way that any successor, no matter the hue or background, is going to outshine Peter Parker. They may do well, but can they stack up to the original “with great power comes great responsibility” hard-luck hero? Probably not.

    Even in general … well, my first comic ever was GL/GA 117. That was Hal Jordan, and while I still dig Hal, I’m really much more into Guy, John, and one or two of the alien GLs. (I still prefer Ollie to Connor, though.) And I was there when Iris Allen was killed; even so, my favorite Flash is Max Mercury and not Barry Allen. Tastes do change, and good writing eventually trumps bad, or so I like to think.

    You do have a solid point about what I have heard described as “default people”, and it’s one for us all to think about. In general, white males of WASPy origins seem to be the “default”, and any divergences from that are explicitly mentioned.


  43. @Kedd: If white wasn’t at least the default state of comic book creation, nobody would be having this conversation at all. You can’t introduce a character by listing his racial makeup instead of his actual character traits, and then expect people not to refer to him by the very things used to introduce him. If the character had been introduced without mentioning his race, but still obviously not white in the pictures, then complaining about people referring to him as ‘Black Spider-Man’ would be valid. But he wasn’t, and so it’s not. It’s too late to see how people would have referred to him if he’d been introduced properly.


  44. Until there are popular black superhero(ine)s, every time a old costume is taken up by a non-white, it will be seen as a ‘——-’ filling the white man’s post.

    black Spiderman… Black Superman… Black Batman…

    a rap song with unacceptable words bleeped out.

    A popular authentic black superhero(ine) is desperately needed.


  45. Dang I can’t find any info on miles backstory, so Marvel really just spoiled what could been a metroid reveal and a big twist.


  46. Just send him back to Africa already. :smug:


  47. [...] Stop Calling Miles “Black Spider-Man” Race has been brought up a lot with a new Ultimate Spider-Man on the way. David discuss the damage of making Miles’s race his defining characteristic. On another related note, there is already Black Spider-Man which is Peter in the black symbiote suit! [...]


  48. @ChristyA: Check out Marvel’s press release that doesn’t mention anything about the race of Miles and then get back to me. Hi srace was brought up by outside media sources and fan boys. Bendis, Alonzo, and Quesada have commented on his race when prompted. Marvel hasn’t pimped the character’s race but they’ve accepted where the conversation has been steered. So in the official press release Miles’ race isn’t mentioned and we still have people on this ignorant “Black” Spider-Man tip. Are you willing to accept the futility of your train of thought?


  49. black spiderman?
    symbiote is back?


  50. It is a shame that comic keep falling back on calling a legecy character that happens to be black the black whatever.

    someday I hope this either stops or we get white legecy character of Black or other characters of colors and everyone calls them the white whatever.

    Hey it’s the white Static
    white black panther

    white cage